COVID-19 Vaccine Information

For COVID-19 vaccine questions, please call our hotline at (405) 425-4489.
Please note: You can not schedule a vaccine appointment by calling this number. All appointments must be made through the online portal listed above.

State of Oklahoma Vaccine Plan


As vaccinations become available to the general population we will add updates and a list of vaccination locations to this page.

As part of the preparation process for the arrival of a COVID-19 vaccine, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) required each state to put together a comprehensive plan describing what the implementation of the new vaccine may look like for their jurisdiction.

WHO CAN RECEIVE THE VACCINE CURRENTLY?

  • Right now, CDC recommends COVID-19 vaccine be offered to healthcare personnel and residents of long-term care facilities. Long-term care residents and staff will primarily be vaccinated through the federal pharmacy partner program, which will operate concurrently to the state’s efforts. The state is in contact with Walgreens and CVS on their plans.
  • Because the current supply of COVID-19 vaccine in the United States is limited, CDC recommends that initial supplies of COVID-19 vaccine be offered to healthcare personnel and long-term care facility residents. Learn more about who should be vaccinated first when vaccine supplies are limited.
  • There is currently a limited supply of COVID-19 vaccine in the United States, but supply will increase in the weeks and months to come.
  • The goal is for everyone to be able to easily get vaccinated against COVID-19 as soon as large enough quantities are available. Once vaccine is widely available, the plan is to have several thousand vaccination providers offering COVID-19 vaccines in doctors’ offices, retail pharmacies, hospitals, and federally qualified health centers.


Safety of the COVID-19 Vaccine

The federal government has been working since the start of the pandemic to make a COVID-19 vaccine available as soon as possible. However, as with all vaccines, safety is a top priority.

  • The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) carefully reviews all safety data from clinical trials and an authorizes emergency vaccine use only when the expected benefits outweigh potential risks.
  • The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) reviews all safety data before recommending any COVID-19 vaccine for use. Learn how ACIP makes vaccine recommendations.
  • FDA and CDC will continue to monitor the safety of COVID-19 vaccines, to make sure even very rare side effects are identified.


BENEFITS OF THE COVID-19 VACCINE


COVID-19 has caused very serious illness and death for a lot of people. If you get COVID-19, you also risk giving it to loved ones who may get very sick. Getting a COVID-19 vaccine is a safer choice.
  • COVID-19 vaccination will help protect you by creating an antibody response without having to experience sickness.
  • Both natural immunity and immunity produced by a vaccine are important aspects of COVID-19 that experts are trying to learn more about, and CDC will keep the public informed as new evidence becomes available.


Concerns about side effects

Most people do not have serious problems after being vaccinated. However, your arm may be sore, red, or warm to the touch. These symptoms usually go away on their own within a week. Some people report getting a headache or fever when getting a vaccine. These side effects are a sign that your immune system is doing exactly what it is supposed to do. It is working and building up protection to disease.

COVID-19 vaccines are being tested in large clinical trials to assess their safety. However, it does take time, and more people getting vaccinated before we learn about very rare or long-term side effects. That is why safety monitoring will continue. CDC has an independent group of experts that reviews all the safety data as it comes in and provides regular safety updates.


How many doses are needed?

Nearly all COVID-19 vaccines being studied in the United States require two shots. The first shot starts building protection, but everyone has to come back a few weeks later for the second one to get the most protection the vaccine can offer.


How much will it cost to get vaccinated?


Vaccine doses purchased with U.S. taxpayer dollars will be given to the American people at no cost. However, vaccination providers may be able to charge administration fees for giving the shot. Vaccination providers can get this fee reimbursed by the patient’s public or private insurance company or, for uninsured patients, by the Health Resources and Services Administration’s Provider Relief Fundexternal icon


Vaccine Types

Understanding How COVID-19 Vaccines Work
The above link explains how the body fights infection and how COVID-19 vaccines protect people by producing immunity. It also describes the different types of COVID-19 vaccines that currently are available or are undergoing large-scale (Phase 3) clinical trials in the United States.

Understanding COVID-19 mRNA Vaccines
The linked fact sheet provides information about mRNA vaccines generally and about COVID-19 vaccines that use this new technology specifically.

Authorized and Recommended Vaccines

As COVID-19 vaccines are authorized and then recommended for use in the United States, it will be important to understand what is known about each vaccine. CDC will provide information on who is and is not recommended to receive each vaccine and what to expect after vaccination, as well as ingredients, safety, and effectiveness. Currently, two vaccines are authorized and recommended to prevent COVID-19:

  • Pfizer-BioNTech's COVID-19 Vaccine
  • Moderna’s COVID-19 vaccines


Vaccines in Phase 3 Clinical Trials

As of November 24, 2020, large-scale (Phase 3) clinical trials are in progress or being planned for three COVID-19 vaccines in the United States:

  • AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine
  • Janssen’s COVID-19 vaccine


What's Next?

Continue wearing a mask, washing your hands and social distancing from others and plan to get the vaccination when it becomes available to you.

Taking preventative measures help to reduce your chance of being exposed to the virus or spreading it to others. The vaccine will work with your immune system so it will be ready to fight the virus if you are exposed.

The combination of getting vaccinated and following CDC’s recommendations to protect yourself and others will offer the best protection from COVID-19.


Stopping a pandemic requires using all the tools we have available. As experts learn more about how COVID-19 vaccination may help reduce spread of the disease in communities, CDC will continue to update the recommendations to protect communities using the latest science.


What to Expect when Getting Vaccinated for COVID-19

Because COVID-19 is a new disease with new vaccines, you may have questions about what happens before, during, and after your appointment to get vaccinated. These tips from CDC will help you know what to expect when you get vaccinated, what information your provider will give you, and resources you can use to monitor your health after you are vaccinated.